Reflections on Practice Theory

Today we delivered the final version of the rather long-titled ‘New Practices for New Publics? Theories of social practice and the voluntary and community sector’ to our clients at the University of Brighton. This one required a bit of extra post-production work because the writers (a very dedicated group!) hope to publish the book and wanted to spend some extra time going through it with a fine-toothed comb. The Book Sprint itself was quite unique as the group spent a lot of time refining concepts and capturing undocumented stories which show the power of the community and voluntary sector. Take the example of New Cross Library, a former municipal library in London which was set to be sold and converted into a supermarket before the local community pulled together and took it over. They now successfully run it as a community, not-for-profit project. Luckily someone who has been covering this project in her PhD thesis was part of the Book Sprint to share the inspiring story. Like and help us promote this...

New Practices for New Publics Book Sprint

Today amidst major building work at Varley Park in Falmer, a group of academics and representatives of local community organisations have been summing up the learnings from the seminar series New Practices for New Publics. The seminars took place over two years, hosted by Brighton University and aimed to create a space for interdisciplinary exchange between academics and civil society organisations [CSOs] in health and social care, youth work and education about practice theory approaches.  Like and help us promote this...

Financing Climate Change Adaptation Book Sprint finished!

Yesterday was the final day of the epic dual-language Sprint in Accra, Ghana. The policy paper written for civil society about how to engage the private sector in climate change adaptation initiatives was  headed by IBIS Ghana, ABANTU for Development, West African Civil Society Forum and SOS Sahel. The paper is rich with case studies of business opportunities which yield profit and positive effects for communities and the environment. Examples range from a micro-insurance scheme to protect small-scale farmers in Burkina Faso against drastic weather to innovative crop storage bags which improve food security across countries in West Africa. The paper ends with a set of recommendations for civil society and the public sector to create a conducive environment for, and guide the private sector, into funding projects which seek to adapt to the changing climate and mitigate its harmful effects. We hope the paper will prove useful to the field! Below some of their impressions:       You can check some of the photos of the Book Sprint here   Like and help us promote this...

Financing Climate Change Adaptation

Yesterday we started our first ever Book Sprint in two languages. Oxfam Ibis has gathered a group of half English-speaking and half French-speaking participants to write a policy brief about financing climate adaptation through the engagement of the private sector. Climate change adaptation refers to the efforts to reduce or minimize the harmful effects of the future climate and to make use of the opportunities which arise.  This is part of Ibis’ two-year project on West African Dialogue of Private Climate Financing, aiming to build the capacity and strategies of civil society to engage the private sector in climate change adaptation efforts. The participants from across West Africa have come together to share their experiences of effective climate adaptation efforts and provide a set of recommendations as a tool for civil society to use in dialogue with the private sector. The Book Sprint process itself is very challenging since traditionally we rely so heavily on quick and lively exchange between contributors, rapid production and reiteration of content, and equal weight of all voices. For this Sprint we have had to adapt our strategies, abandoning the simultaneous translation by the second day. We are running two parallel processes with the two language groups and finding moments to come back together and merge the two groups’ outputs. Luckily we have a few bilingual people who are acting as our bridges. See photos of the Book Sprints here on flickr. Like and help us promote this...

Book Sprint on Liquefied Natural Gas in Africa

The latest Book Sprint, now taking place in Maryland brings together a group of experts organised by the US Energy Association and the Department of Energy to create a handbook for African governments wanting to set up natural gas development projects. The handbook will be a reference document that helps government officials better understand the options, and the stakeholder shared aims, for developing LNG projects. Like and help us promote this...